15 Summertime Recipes

Most of us don’t need an excuse to celebrate summer weather. Brewfests and competitions abound, family reunions are planned and backyard parties pop up — even wardrobes get the special treatment with short sleeves and sandals. So why not brew something that tastes great at the beach or barbecue, a thirst-quencher that goes down great after a day of gardening or while grilling?

Summer brewing doesn’t differ that much from brewing during the other seasons. You may slap a few more mosquitoes while mashing, but the biggest difference comes when it’s time to chill your wort and maintain your fermentation temperature.  When making a summer brew, make sure to check the temperature of your chilled wort (with a sanitized thermometer).  As your tap water is likely warmer in the summer, you may need to add a few more ice cubes to your water bath to cool your wort down to proper fermentation temperatures. Likewise, higher outside temperatures means your usual “cool spot” in the house may be too warm for fermenting.

Try one of these tried and true seasonal recipes from homebrew shops across the country. (BYO calculated the brewing statistics, such as OG and IBU.) Or, use them as inspiration for designing your own summer sipper. In this collection, we present a beach-ready golden ale from the U.S. Gulf Coast, a Mexican lager from California (lime optional), a crisp rye pale ale from Vancouver and many more. Feeling refreshed yet?

DeFalco’s Golden Ale
DeFalco’s Home Wine & Beer Supplies
Houston, Texas

http://www.defalcos.com
(5 gallons/19 L, extract with grains)
OG = 1.047  FG = 1.011
IBU = 23  SRM = 5  ABV = 4.6%
It’s so bloody hot on the Gulf Coast, this summer recipe is popular pretty much year ‘round.

Ingredients

6.0 lbs. (2.7 kg) Alexander’s Pale liquid malt extract
(or 5.0 lbs. (2.3 kg) Muntons Extra
Light dried malt extract)
1 lb. (0.45 kg) domestic two-row pale malt
0.5 lb. (0.23 kg) CaraPils® malt
6 AAU Cascade hops (45 mins)
(1.0 oz./28 g of 6% alpha acid)
2.25 AAU Liberty hops (10 mins)
(0.5 oz./14.2 g of 4.5% alpha acid)
2.25 AAU Liberty hops (0 mins)
(0.5 oz./14.2 g of 4.5% alpha acid)
1 pkg. Burton water salts
1 pkg. Nottingham Ale or Wyeast 1056
(American Ale), 1007 (German Ale), White Labs WLP001
(California Ale) or WLP 029 (German Ale) yeast.
1 pkg. Bru-Vigor
0.75 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Step by Step

In a small saucepan, bring a gallon (3.8 L) of water to 160–170 °F (71–77 °C). Add the bag of grains and water salts and steep 30 minutes. Now, gently sparge (rinse) the grains with hot tap water (ideal temperature 168 °F/76 °C) and bring the total volume up to two or more gallons in your brewpot. Bring to boil.

Turn off heat and add malt extract. Return to boil, add the hops at the times specified in the ingredient list. Add the last does of Liberty hops and immediately turn off heat. Let stand for 20-30 minutes in a cooling bath. Pour the cooled wort into the fermenter. Bring the volume up to five gallons (19 L). If the temperature is less than 80 °F (27 °C), pitch the yeast and the packet of Bru-Vigor (if using) into the wort and place the lid and airlock over the fermenter. Ferment at 65–70 °F (18–24 °C). After fermentation, check the specific gravity. The F.G. should be 1.011 or less. If it is higher than 1.016, allow to ferment and settle for a few more days. Prime and bottle. Allow beer to age at room temperature for at least two weeks. Peak flavor is reached after six weeks.

To read this full article, check out: 15 Summertime Recipes

Bottling Your Home Brew

So you’re interested in brewing your own home made beer? And why shouldn’t you be? It’s estimated that that 250,000 to 500,000 people in America make their own beer, which makes home brewing more or less of a great American hobby. It’s extremely cost effective, with kit prices being as low as $100 in some cases and ingredients being as low as $60 in other cases. It’s also a fun process that allows you to experiment with different recipes and provide yourself and friends with a superior beer that’s much less expensive than any commercial brand.
If you’re on your way to becoming your own independent brew-master you’ll have a lot to think about. Besides what recipes to attempt, here are a few tips about the kinds of bottles you might want to look at for bottling purposes, and also what kinds of branding you may want to try.

BEER BOTTLE TYPES:

First off, it should be noted that beer bottles come in various sizes, shapes and colors. Dark glass prevents light from spoiling the beer. However, lighter colored bottles are often used for marketing reasons

The Stubby: Shorter and flatter than standard bottles, having virtually no neck, stubbies pack into a smaller space for transporting. The bottles are sometimes made with thick glass and are therefore sturdier, and can also be cleaned and reused before being recycled.  Stubbies are normally tinted brown or green, and very few American beers are bottled in the stubby.

The Growler: The growler can hold half a gallon of draft beer, but also comes in a liter and quart size. The typical take-out beer, customers can bring in their personal growlers for refill from their favorite tap. One of the advantages of buying beer this way is that it is generally cheaper. Growlers are usually tinted a dark color.

The Long Neck: Lastly, there’s the long neck beer bottle. The long neck is the most prevalent type of bottle used in America. Tall and slim with a long neck, these bottles are known as the ISB, or Industry Standard Bottle, according to the Beer Club. Long neck’s can be recycled and reused many times, and can come in clear glass and tinted. However, they are more highly represented by clear glass than other types of bottles. The bottle is easy to hold, and most consumers tend to hold the neck rather than the body in order to prevent their hands from warming the beer inside.

LABEL TIPS:

Now that you’re more familiar with the types of bottles that are available you should begin to consider the types of branding suitable for your beer. Investing in custom beer labels is a wise decision as they are often less expensive than machine-placed labels and can come with more creative leeway, which will enable you to put your own authentic style into them. This is very important because you want your beer to emphasize your style as a brewer, therefore the label on the bottle should be as good as the beer inside the bottle.

With that having been said, what you ought to consider first is the type of material your beer label will be made out of. Several materials to consider are foil, clear plastic, or high-grade paper. You should also consider the shape of your label and whether or not to include a neck label as well. Most importantly, the design of your label should have the most thought behind it. Just think of people’s reactions if you show up to a birthday party, holiday event, or even a wedding with your own brand of beer decorated with well designed labels.

A wide variety of expertly designed, custom beer labels can be found at Labels on the Fly.

Stay tuned for home wine and beer recipes and tips from Custombottle!



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